Beachcombing on the Oregon Coast

Beachcombing

Beachcombing is a favorite activity here on the Oregon coast. With the storms and often rainy weather, lots of different things make its way onto the coastline and beaches of Oregon. Unfortunately, unless you use driftwood to make furniture or other items, you won’t find much just strolling the beaches without the proper equipment.

Here’s how to get the most out of your beachcombing adventure.

Beachcombing

Get the right foot wear! Beachcombing involves both exploring the beach and the water, so grab some felt bottomed scuba shoes for protection against the rocks and avoiding slippery situations.

Beachcombing

Grab some containers! A plastic bag and a canvas bag work great. Use the canvas bag for holding any goodies you find, and help keep Oregon clean by picking up any trash you find and placing it in your plastic bag. A healthy beach is a happy beach!

Beachcombing

Sunscreen is a must, even on the mostly cloudy Oregon coast! Cover up your arms and legs and apply sunscreen, especially if you plan to explore the beaches for long periods of time. Cloudy days often cause sun rays to be magnified, therefore causing a more severe burn.

Beachcombing

Bring your camera, and capture some beautiful shots of the Oregon coast, your treasure, or anything else you might like to remember forever!

Beachcombing

Metal detectors can often help you find things hidden beneath the sand. Don’t let a little sand cause you an “out of sight, out of mind” missed opportunity.

Beachcombing

Remember to leave the wild life alone. Beachcombing involves find hidden treasures that are not living or housing living animals. This includes starfish, crabs, turtles, and even shells housing hermit crabs. If it’s dead, it’s alright to take. Capture everything with your camera that you’re unable to physically bring back home with you! It’s the next best thing!

Beachcombing

Always watch out for sneaker waves while exploring the Oregon coast. Never turn your back on the water, especially on stormy days. Too many people have been dragged out to sea due to sneaker waves. Stay safe and keep children and animals close to you at all times.

Beachcombing

The best times for beachcombing are during the winter, early AM, at low or receding tide when you have access to more areas of the beach, and right after a storm. Since storms occur frequently on the Oregon coast, you’ll always have a great chance of finding something interesting on your beachcombing trip.

Beachcombing

Every year, Lincoln City places glass floats on their beaches, free to anyone who finds one, or several, if you’re lucky! This event runs from mid October to late May. The floats are placed randomly across Lincoln City’s beaches during this time period, weather permitting.

On your next visit to the Oregon coast, or if you’re already a permanent resident, come try your luck at beachcombing! The water is calling!

Exploring Cape Lookout, Oregon

Cape Lookout trail
Viewing the Oregon coast from the Cape Lookout Trail!

Looking for a new place to explore while visiting the Oregon coast this summer? Why not head out to Cape Lookout, just north of Pacific City and south of Netarts! This hike is easy and beautiful but requires hiking boots after a big storm or a couple days of straight, unrelenting rain on the coast. Otherwise, normal tennis shoes are just fine.

Small children are not recommended for this hike as there are no railings and several areas of steep cliff overlooking the Pacific. If they are young enough to be carried on your back, please feel free to do so! Of course, this is up to your best judgment! Dogs are more than welcome to go on this hike with you but must be leashed at all times.

Cape Lookout trail
You can even see Netarts from this hike!

There are three hikes that can be found here at Cape Lookout. The South Trail, the North Trail, and the Cape Lookout Trail. The hike out to Cape Lookout is 2.4 miles long, 5 miles round trip, and can take between 1 and 2 hours to reach. The path is fairly narrow, with tree roots covering a majority of the pathway. The ground is moderately level, but has periods of incline and decline.

Cape Lookout trail
The end of the road at Cape Lookout!

You’ll know you’ve reached the end when you hit sea, a bench to relax on, and nowhere else to go but the way you came! Congratulations! You just walked 2.4 miles and gained 930 feet in elevation! Feel free to bring a small lunch or snack to enjoy at Cape Lookout before heading back.

Cape Lookout Trail
Be careful when looking over the side of these steep cliffs!

Please note that there are no restrooms on the trail or at the end of trail. There is a port-a-potty at the beginning of the trail in the parking lot. Additional parking for this trail can be found off of the main road, on the shoulders.

Cape Lookout is a very popular trail, so expect to see lots of other people, with breathtaking views of the coastline, the Pacific, and Haystack Rock in Pacific City! You might even catch a glimpse of some migrating whales, or other sea life!

Cape Lookout trail
Enjoy the hike and the gorgeous views that come with it!

Here’s how to get there:

Travel to Pacific City if you’re coming from down south. From here, turn left from Brooten Road at the stop sign onto Pacific Aveune, then right onto Cape Kiwanda Drive at the stop sign. Continue along this road until you reach a 3 way intersection. Continue straight. At the next 3 way intersection, turn left onto Cape Lookout Road. Continue on this road until you see the sign for Cape Lookout. Park in the parking lot or along the shoulder.

If you’re coming from the north, travel south along Highway 101 until you hit Sandlake Road. Continue straight until you reach a 3 way intersection. Continue straight until you reach the sign for Cape Lookout. Park in the parking lot or along the road on the shoulders.

You can also travel south from Tillamook by taking 3rd Street and turning left onto Netarts Highway West, then left onto Whiskey Creek Road which turns into Cape Lookout Road West. Look for the Cape Lookout sign and park in the parking lot or on the shoulder.

If you’re in Oceanside or Netarts, travel down 131 to Netarts Bay Drive until it turns into Cape Lookout Road West. Look for the Cape Lookout sign and park in the parking lot or on the shoulder.

10 Pet Friendly Vacation Homes

Finding a beautiful vacation home for 4 or more guests and a dog can sometimes be a challenge. Here at Oregon Beach Vacations, we want you to get the most out of your precious vacation time without the stress of figuring out what to do with the pups. Check out these ten beautiful dog friendly vacation rentals on the Oregon coast, and have your best vacation yet!

1. Barry’s Fishing Peer – This gorgeous home located in Garibaldi is perfect for 8 guests and 2 dogs with 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths! A fenced in yard is available to keep an eye on both the pups and the children, while also enjoying a beautiful view of the Pacific from the deck. You’ll have the time of your life here at Barry’s Fishing Peer! You can even rent out the adjoining building, Rick’s Fishing Peer, for more guests! Book today!

Barry's Fishing Peer in Garibaldi, Oregon
Barry’s Fishing Peer in Garibaldi, Oregon

Continue reading 10 Pet Friendly Vacation Homes

3 Scenic Views – Lincoln City Area

If you’re looking for a good hike while you’re on vacation in Lincoln City, make sure to check out the following locations. They are all within a 40 minute drive or less and offer beautiful views of the Oregon coastline!

Lincoln-City-Thumb
The view from the Knoll of Roads End

The Knoll – Located in Roads End, just north of Lincoln City, is a grassy hill that overlooks the Pacific Ocean and Roads End, along with Lincoln City and Devil’s Lake. This beautiful patch of land can be discovered by hiking up a steep hill. It’s completely worth the sore calves when you see the view. Make sure to bring water, a snack, and your camera to capture the glory from this little spot of land in Roads End! Continue reading 3 Scenic Views – Lincoln City Area